Tag Archives: apocalyptica

‘There’s no feeling of anarchy': Apocalyptica talk sorry state of metal, embracing Metallica past.

Since its inception, heavy metal has borrowed liberally from the work of classical composers – what is Black Sabbath’s “Black Sabbath,” after all, if not a reworking ofGustav Holst’s “Mars”? Since 1993, the cello-based Finnish group Apocalyptica has been working to reverse engineer that formula, first reimagining Metallica’s compositions  before branching out to include their own work, drafting in vocalists from the likes of Slipknot and Bush to round out their sound. For their eighth studio album, Shadowmaker, the group (which now includes full-time vocalist Franky Perez) hunkered down in a Tennessee studio to produce their most cohesive release to date. Lead cellist Eicca Toppinen and drummer Mikko Sirén recently spoke with the Post’s Jonathan Dekel about refining their sound, the stale metal scene and finally becoming a band two decades after forming.

Q Your last release was a live album with a full orchestra celebrating the 200th birthday of Richard Wagner. How did that evolve to Shadowmaker’s relatively minimalist arrangements?

Sirén: As we flirted with all these large bands we had an urge to go small, back to the essence of the band.

Toppinen: After we finished the last orchestra tour we wanted to focus on ourselves — to put our musical interests in focus. And when it came time to record the vocals we decided to only have one singer because that helped us not depend on anything outside the band, so the band could deliver everything. Metal music has the inclination to try to make everything sound bigger and [the result is] nothing sounds personal. Nothing touches you anymore; it’s just a wall of sound.

Q: As instrumentalists, how do you find that personality? 

Toppinen: When we started writing this album we were listening to bands like the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Rage Against the Machine and System of a Down– all the bands who have a really strong character. That was something we really wanted to approach.

Q Do you see yourselves as outsiders in the metal community?

Toppinen: There has always been difficulties defining Apocalyptica because we’ve always been moving and changing and that’s something we wanted to eliminate: make the whole package more tight. We wanted to be treated like a real band.

I think we are very much in between [worlds]. We combine a lot of elements from pop music and aesthetics from electronic music with the metal elements. Old school metal is old school metal and there are some cool metal bands today which are trying to refresh the scene but I think there’s too much metal without the metal attitude. There’s no feeling of anarchy or challenging authority.

Sirén: Now-a-days it’s enough if you have distortion and a double bass drum. In the beginning it was punk, it was rebellious; it was dangerous. You could smell the music. Now it’s super clinical. All of a sudden the music which began as a way to go against rules and storm barriers is suddenly the most protective and most conservative.

Q Do you think your name’s connection with Metallica has helped or hindered your success?

Toppinen: That’s part of our history and we wouldn’t exist without Metallica so we have no problem with that. Of course, it’s funny to see in reviews that the intro is always about the Metallica covers and stuff like that and it’s f–king almost 20 years ago that we made the Metallica record. But it’s still a way for journalists to explain the band and we’re totally fine with it.

Shadowmaker is available now. Apocalyptica play Vancouver May 30, Edmonton June 1 and Calgary June 2.

Q&A: Franky Perez of metal band Apocalyptica

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Apocalyptica, Finland’s top musical export, performs on May 30 at the Commodore Ballroom.
Apocalyptica

May 30 at 9:30 p.m. | Commodore Ballroom

Tickets: $32.50 at ticketmaster.ca

What began as a Metallica tribute band with cellos has evolved into Finland’s top musical export. Since 1993 Apocalyptica has released eight studio albums, each staying true to its heavy metal/classical roots while relying increasingly on original material. Shadowmaker, the latest, follows this pattern, but with a difference — rather than welcoming a number of guest vocalists, as on previous albums, the new record features just one, Franky Perez. Now a full-fledged member of the band, Perez — whose previous gigs include playing with the band Scars on Broadway and with Guns N Roses guitarist Slash — talked about his future with Apocalyptica, staying true to metal roots and being a Yank in Finland.

Q: Have you noticed anything different about playing with a bunch of Finns compared to being in American bands?

A: There’s definitely a little bit of culture clash. They live on the other side of the world, and I’m from Las Vegas, Nevada. It’s polar opposites. But, without being cliché or cheesy, we speak one common language — music.

Q: Did you make the album in Finland?

A: We did some pre-production in Nashville. Once we got the songs where we wanted them, we went back to Finland and rehearsed them for a couple of weeks and got them really nice and tight and went back to Nashville. I’ve been to Finland three times now, and come July, I’ll be there for awhile. I’ll be hubbing out of there while we do festival appearances in Europe.

Q: It seems you’ve been kind of a floater, leading a nomadic musical life, playing in a bunch of different bands.

A: One steady thing I’ve had in my career is my own stuff. But I’ve been a singer and musician for hire for over 10 years. This is a bit of a change. You have to find ways to provide and make a living. I’m very fortunate to have been a professional musician all my life. In the same sense I’ve been looking for that project. I thought Scars on Broadway was it, then the plug was pulled on that. I went back to being a musician-for-hire. Then when this came up — I’ll be with these guys as long as I can, they’re a great band, the music’s amazing. I’ve been offered full-time positions with other bands but this one really hit home, and made me want to be a part of it full-time.

Q: What was your relationship to Apocalyptica before you got the call to sing with them?

A: About four or five years ago, Scars on Broadway was playing the Area 4 festival in Germany. We were on the same stage as Apocalyptica, a few bands before. There’s been a big buzz around the festival about them, so I made a point after our set to stick around. So I sat on the side of the stage and watched them play, and now five years later I’m in the band.

Q: Apocalyptica started out playing Metallica covers. Is that something you still do?

A: They’re very true to their roots. There’s a part of the show where they throw it back to Metallica. They let the crowd know this is where they started, and they do (Metallica song) Nothing Else Matters. They might do a couple. They know where they came from. These guys are standup guys. They know what fans want and they do it.

Q: And Apocalyptica is going to be on a stamp in Finland. What do you know about that?

A: It’s amazing. From what I was told, they’re doing a whole series on Finnish artists and music. Apocalyptica was the biggest musical export from Finland, so it was a no-brainer that the Finnish government would give them a stamp. I was there when they got the email. Paavo Lötjönen, the bass cellist, was reading it. He looks at me and goes, “Hey Frankie, do you have a stamp?” I said “No.” And he said, “I do.”

 

Apocalyptica: Heavy metal on heavy wood

We might like to imagine that it was us clever North Americans who came up with the awesome idea to play Metallica songs with cellos – or that we had the shameless determination to make it more than just novelty.

But no, Apocalyptica is another fine Scandinavian import.

Apocalyptica-bw-400x400

 

Part of the rich legacy of music from the dark, cold region that brought us Bjork, ABBA, Ingmar Bergman, death metal and Vikings, the Finnish cello trio guarantees no guitars will be used during its show at the Union Hall on Monday, June 1. Hard to believe, but it’s true. Those cellos can really rip through a good Blackstar guitar amp – which also provides the best clean sound a real cello craves.

Apocalyptica first popped up in mid-1990s, armed with heavy metal covers played by a classically-trained string quartet – which attracted an unusual cross section of fans from both the metal and classical worlds. At first, the group members didn’t think it was much of a novelty. They were simply playing the music they liked with the instruments they knew how to play. Then a record company guy caught a show and saw dollar signs, or Euros, anyway, and tried to talk the guys into making a record.

“The record company needed to convince the dudes, hey, let’s do this anyway,” says drummer Mikko Sirén, who joined the group 13 years ago, well after Apocalyptica had ditched the cover band shtick. “They were concentrating on classical careers back then so it took them a long period of time to realize, that yes, there is a bigger interest in this kind of music. Maybe the guys were being naive or dumb not to realize it.”

Apocalyptica GigCity EdmontonThat didn’t last. With some members changes here and there, and cellist Paavo Lötjönen the only original left, the group has released seven albums since the 1996 debut Plays Metallica By Four Cellos. The latest, all original, is Shadowmaker, the band’s first with a permanent vocalist (Franky Perez; they’d previously worked with guests that include Corey Taylor from Slipknot and a host of other stars of the North American metal scene), and an album that certainly sounds as dark and heavy as anything from the modern Scandinavian metal scene. And as fans know, that’s pretty heavy. You can just hear it.

That’s because rock bands are a product of their environment, Sirén says. “Heavy metal,” he says, “especially in Northern countries, in Finland and Norway, it’s very strongly connected to our folk music, chord progressions, even the instruments used, and how we feel we are so close to nature. Nature over there is wild, untamed. However cliche that might sound, I feel that reflects in the music that people from the North do.”

He adds, “No matter what you do, only American bands sound like American bands, only British bands sound like British bands. Your culture, your heritage has a lot to do with how you sound.”

SIXX:AM and Apocalyptica rock The Bomb Factory

The Deep Ellum Arts District in downtown Dallas is known for it’s music scene, and has had many amazing music venues over the years. Recently one of those historic venues, The Bomb Factory, reopened and what could be a better way to show they intend to inject some major energy into the Dallas music scene then by bringing in SIXX:AM and Apocalyptica.

VAMPS
Kelly Hitt
View all19 photos
Nikki Sixx rocking The Bomb Factory

Kelly Hitt

Despite the threat of major storms on Friday night, the line to get into The Bomb Factory wrapped around the building. Three bands were scheduled to hit the stage – VAMPS (a Japanese rock duo formed in 2008), the Finnish cello gods,Apocalyptica, and SIXX:AM, the side project of Mötley Crüe’s Nikki Sixx. While last two bands I knew well, I had never heard of VAMPS and wasn’t sure what to expect. I was pleasantly surprised. These guys knew how to rock and really got the ever growing crowd energized. It’s no secret I love bands with a bit of a goth rock vibe, and VAMPS delivered on that score. Getting a little “Sex Blood Rock n’ Roll”- to start the night off was the perfect way to go and I know the band had many more fans by the time they left the stage.

Apocalyptica has been around for twenty years, and though they are from Finland they have a strong fan base here in the States. And those fans were out in force Friday night to welcome the Finns back to Dallas. For the few in attendance who had never seen Apocalyptica, it was a surprise. It’s not often you see a rock band with nothing but three cellists, a drummer, and a guest vocalist but that’s what you get with these guys. And they proved once again that they can rival any rock band out there. Think you can’t head bang while playing a cello? Apocalyptica will prove you wrong. This time around they did things a little different. On previous albums the band has brought in several well known guest vocalists to contribute and then hired someone to do vocals on tour, but with their new album, Shadowmaker, they hired Franky Perez to not only do vocals for the entire album but to go on tour as well. His sound compliments the band perfectly and with Franky working closely with Eicca, Perttu, and Paavo even before recording began, Shadowmaker is perhaps the tightest album I’ve heard from this band. They killed it on stage as well, working the fans up and doing things on cellos you’ve only ever seen with guitars. They were quick to point out that they will be back later in the year when they do their headlining tour for Shadowmaker and it’s a show you won’t want to miss.

SIXX:AM started out with Nikki Sixx, DJ Ashba and James Michael writing a soundtrack of sorts to Nikki’s book The Heroin Diaries. From there the fans took over, demanding songs like Life Is Beautiful be played on the radio and clamoring for more music. As Nikki said Friday night, SIXX:AM is here because the fans made it so and while he thought he was about to retire (from Mötley Crüe), SIXX:AM is just getting started. And rightly so. This was their first ever headlining tour (promoting the album Modern Vintage) and with seasoned performers like this you know you’re getting something amazing right out of the gate. They owned the stage and brought the house down in what was truly a special night for both the fans who had been waiting for this for a long time and the band that still seemed to be happily amazed it was happening.

It’s been a while since I’ve gone to a show where I truly enjoyed every band on stage and was greatly pleased with the venue (lights, sound, staff) as well. That these bands were great and that the venue let them truly shine just made the night as a whole one I’ll definitely remember. If you get a chance to see this show in another city, don’t miss it.

SIXX: AM and Apocalyptica rock The Bomb Factory

The Deep Ellum Arts District in downtown Dallas is known for it’s music scene, and has had many amazing music venues over the years. Recently one of those historic venues, The Bomb Factory, reopened and what could be a better way to show they intend to inject some major energy into the Dallas music scene then by bringing in SIXX:AM and Apocalyptica.

VAMPS
Kelly Hitt

 

View all19 photos
Nikki Sixx rocking The Bomb Factory

 

Kelly Hitt

 

Despite the threat of major storms on Friday night, the line to get into The Bomb Factory wrapped around the building. Three bands were scheduled to hit the stage – VAMPS (a Japanese rock duo formed in 2008), the Finnish cello gods,Apocalyptica, and SIXX:AM, the side project of Mötley Crüe’s Nikki Sixx. While last two bands I knew well, I had never heard of VAMPS and wasn’t sure what to expect. I was pleasantly surprised. These guys knew how to rock and really got the ever growing crowd energized. It’s no secret I love bands with a bit of a goth rock vibe, and VAMPS delivered on that score. Getting a little “Sex Blood Rock n’ Roll”- to start the night off was the perfect way to go and I know the band had many more fans by the time they left the stage.

Apocalyptica has been around for twenty years, and though they are from Finland they have a strong fan base here in the States. And those fans were out in force Friday night to welcome the Finns back to Dallas. For the few in attendance who had never seen Apocalyptica, it was a surprise. It’s not often you see a rock band with nothing but three cellists, a drummer, and a guest vocalist but that’s what you get with these guys. And they proved once again that they can rival any rock band out there. Think you can’t head bang while playing a cello? Apocalyptica will prove you wrong. This time around they did things a little different. On previous albums the band has brought in several well known guest vocalists to contribute and then hired someone to do vocals on tour, but with their new album, Shadowmaker, they hired Franky Perez to not only do vocals for the entire album but to go on tour as well. His sound compliments the band perfectly and with Franky working closely with Eicca, Perttu, and Paavo even before recording began, Shadowmaker is perhaps the tightest album I’ve heard from this band. They killed it on stage as well, working the fans up and doing things on cellos you’ve only ever seen with guitars. They were quick to point out that they will be back later in the year when they do their headlining tour for Shadowmaker and it’s a show you won’t want to miss.

SIXX:AM started out with Nikki Sixx, DJ Ashba and James Michael writing a soundtrack of sorts to Nikki’s book The Heroin Diaries. From there the fans took over, demanding songs like Life Is Beautiful be played on the radio and clamoring for more music. As Nikki said Friday night, SIXX:AM is here because the fans made it so and while he thought he was about to retire (from Mötley Crüe), SIXX:AM is just getting started. And rightly so. This was their first ever headlining tour (promoting the album Modern Vintage) and with seasoned performers like this you know you’re getting something amazing right out of the gate. They owned the stage and brought the house down in what was truly a special night for both the fans who had been waiting for this for a long time and the band that still seemed to be happily amazed it was happening.

It’s been a while since I’ve gone to a show where I truly enjoyed every band on stage and was greatly pleased with the venue (lights, sound, staff) as well. That these bands were great and that the venue let them truly shine just made the night as a whole one I’ll definitely remember. If you get a chance to see this show in another city, don’t miss it.

Gotta get it right: an interview with Sixx: A.M. and Apocalyptica

Gotta Get It Right: An Interview with Sixx:A.M. and Apocalyptica

—by , April 15, 2015

I’ve never kept it a secret in all of my columns that Mötley Crüe might be my favorite band of all time. I’ve also never kept it a secret that bassist Nikki Sixx has been my idol since childhood. That being said, when Sixx:A.M., Nikki’s side-project, released The Heroin Diaries Soundtrack back in 2007, there was a new excitement in me like a little school girl that Nikki Sixx was going to be doing this for a little while longer even after Mötley Crüe hung up their instruments for good. Well, the latter actually happens at the end of 2015 and Sixx:A.M. hits the road for the first time this month since Crue Fest in 2009, something Sixx:A.M. fans have been longing for since. Sixx:A.M. has released two studio albums since The Heroin Diaries Soundtrack, which rumors are saying is being turned into a Broadway play. In 2011, they released This Is Gonna Hurt and this past October, Modern Vintage.

On April 24, Sixx:A.M. brings their sold-out show to the Starland Ballroom in Sayreville, NJ, then the Best Buy Theater in NYC on April 27 and the Electric Factory in Philly on April 28. They won’t be coming alone, though. Tagging along will be Apocalyptica and just added on certain dates from Japan, Vamps. Back in October, Apocalyptica was added to the Eleven Seven Music family. They are the label owned by Mötley Crüe’s manager, Allen Kovac, and houses a roster including Mötley Crüe, Sixx:A.M., Buckcherry, Papa Roach, Hellyeah, Drowning Pool…you get the idea. They’re in great company! Not bad for a former Metallica tribute band! Well, Apocalyptica’s eighth studio CD and Eleven Seven Music debut, Shadowmaker, dropped this week. To celebrate the CD’s release and their tour together, I got on a three-way call with Sixx:A.M. singer James Michael and Apocalyptica drummer Mikko Siren. Here’s how it all went down:

This is the first tour for Sixx:A.M. since Crue Fest back in 2008. We’ve been asking for it and now it’s finally here. How exciting is it for you, James?

James Michael: It is so exciting! Ever since we did Crue Fest, it was like wetting our lips and we discovered at that point that we definitely were cut out to do this. We were a band because up until that point, we really were not thinking of ourselves as a band. And Crue Fest was so much fun, and then sadly for the next several years, we just were not able to make a tour work for any of us because of our schedules. So, this is literally a dream come true for all three of us. We just couldn’t be happier. Now, to be able to put together a show with three full studio length records under our belt is a real luxury for us.

Three records worth of material for your first tour is a lot of music…

JM: It really is. It didn’t even really occur to us that that would be the case until we started putting together the setlist. We were like, “Wow, we actually do have a lot of songs for a band that is as young as we are as far as what we’ve done together.” It’s good to have that many songs to choose from, but it’s been a lot of fun shaping the show and of course, we could not be more excited to have Apocalyptica out there with us because it’s going to make for just an incredible night of music.

Mikko, how exciting is it for you and the rest of Apocalyptica to be a part of this long-awaited tour?

MIKKO SIREN: It’s really amazing! We have toured America a lot, but being a part of this tour and to be able to be support for Sixx:A.M., that’s really like a step up for us. We are just absolutely excited. I also think, as James just said, that the evening is just going to be absolutely amazing, musically. It’s really thrilling and who knows where it will take us. Maybe we will end up making music together, but it will be a fantastic tour I am sure.

Now, did you guys in Apocalyptica grow up as fans of Nikki Sixx’s work?

MS: How could you not? I don’t think it’s possible if you listen to rock music in general that you wouldn’t grow up into that thing. Of course, being in Mötley Crüe was a big thing, but when I listened to the first album of Sixx:A.M. back in 2009 for the first time, it was really something that kicked me then big time and of course, you would never think that you’d be sharing the stage with a person that you like or you look up to every night. It’s kind of like amazing for us.

Now, VAMPS have recently been added to the tour. Did you guys really bring them back from Japan with you when you were out there back in February?

JM: (Laughs) You know what? It was so fun. We went over and played Tokyo and we did a show with the VAMPS and we were just blown away by their fanbase, by their show and their production. They’re just such an incredible band. And what we really loved about this idea is just making this a real global tour, a celebration of global music. Especially with social media and everything becoming so global, it just made a lot of sense for us to combine music from all around the world. That’s what we started doing with this tour.

Mikko, have you heard of this band the VAMPS, and are you a fan of their music as well?

MS: I must admit that I did not know the band before I heard they were going to be on the same tour then of course, I went to check them out and listen to their stuff and we’ve been privileged with Japanese bands before and that’s a whole different ballgame. Just like James said, trying to combine this music from all over the world, it’s like a cultural thing. They look so different. I’ve never heard of VAMPS. I’ve never seen them live, but their music is great! Normally, Japanese bands are able to pull out amazing shows.

Now, James…Bravo on Modern Vintage! I am such a huge fan of everything Sixx:A.M. has put out so far. Not only because Nikki is an idol of mine, but you and Nikki together, as songwriters, has been a match made in heaven. Did these new songs on Modern Vintage just flow out of you?

JM: Well, thank you for saying that and yeah, they really did. I think that what’s exciting about this record for us is that I feel like we really found our sweet spot as songwriters together as a songwriting team, and that’s always an exciting moment in any creative chemistry to get to the point where you feel like you can just finish each other’s sentences. And as much as a cliché as that is, it’s a very important moment to reach in any songwriting team, and I feel like we really did that in Modern Vintage. So, it’s been exciting for us to reach this point of our partnership and then be able to push those boundaries back even further and then explore even further with the confidence that we now know that we’ve got each other’s backs and we can really lean heavily on each other in the songwriting world.

Now, Mikko, back in October, Apocalyptica joined the Eleven Seven Music roster and on April 21, you’ll be releasing your new CD, Shadowmaker. The band’s come a long way from being a Metallica tribute band. What can you say about joining a roster like the bands on Eleven Seven Music and putting out your seventh CD release under their label?

MS: It’s really, really amazing! The whole thing, how I feel about Eleven Seven Music, is that they’re not like a record company how I’ve seen them. It’s kind of a family thing in a way that they’re so passionate and so tied together and how they pick their bands. They really put the effort in. They wouldn’t find a band that they couldn’t believe that they can push forward and it’s really like feeling you work together with those people and it’s all about the people. It’s just an amazing personnel they have over there like Allen Kovac being the head of the team. He gives you the feeling that he trusts you and respects the artist and the music maker, which creates us to respect them for the work that they do. So far it’s just been absolutely amazing!

Now, Apocalyptica is known for their collaborations with some of the best singers in rock today. Are there any collaborations on Shadowmaker?

MS: That was the point when we changed kind of a thing. We’ve been doing, as you said, these collaborations for over 15 years now and it’s been great and we have been making amazing music when we got to meet these great singers, but we thought we need to somehow do a change. We thought that we needed to challenge ourselves to be something more and try new things and that’s when we started to think about the possibilities to having just the one singer on the album. It was quite a while for us because we are slow Finnish dudes, but we were thinking it over for a while. Then we ended up in a situation where we just have one guy [Franky Perez] singing everything and also to have that guy tour with us. So, he’s kind of like part of the band at the moment. He sings all the vocal tracks on the album and it’s great!

JM: Hey Mikko, I’ve got a bone to pick with you, man. Ever since I first heard you guys, I’ve been wondering, “What does a singer gotta do to get asked to sing on an Apocalyptica record?” (Laughs) Ever since I first heard of you guys. In fact, I was mixing a Scorpions record with Desmond Child and he’s the one who actually introduced me to you guys several years ago, and I’ve just been completely floored by everything you guys have done ever since then. I thought for sure one of these days, I’d get asked to sing. No such luck. Now, you actually got a singer, dammit! (Laughs)

MS: You need to come and sing with us when we’re on tour! Let’s make it fun!

JM: All right, man! I’m in!

With Sixx:A.M. kind of on the shelf for the past seven years, as far as touring goes, while Mötley Crüe toured and DJ Ashba was touring with Guns ‘N’ Roses, why wasn’t there any option for James Michael to do any touring of his own?

JM: You know what? It’s funny. I spend most of my time producing records and writing songs for other artists, so while Nikki and DJ are clearly out there traveling the world and making music, it’s probably really my schedule that has made it more difficult for us to do anything because I’m constantly in my cave recording things. That being said, putting together this tour and just doing the couple of shows we’ve done recently, I’ve been asking myself that too because I’ve been having so much fun getting out of the studio and actually getting some sunshine on my face and singing songs and performing again. So, I would say moving forward, I don’t know that I’d really be interested in doing solo stuff, but I would love to get out and do more performing and collaborations that are geared more towards live stuff. So, we’ll see what the future holds. I have done some recording and made videos and put stuff out there and it’s always fun. I’m always creating something. So, we’ll see what the schedule allows moving forward.

What songs from the three records can we expect to hear on this tour?

JM: Well, we went back to social media and asked our fans what they wanted to hear, and for as simple as a concept as that was, it was very exciting for us to do that. It really helped us shape the set. It was just interesting to see what songs on these records were resonating with people and there were certain ones that were just overwhelmingly consistent throughout people’s responses and other ones were a real surprise. There’s going to be some surprises on there and I think it’s going to be a great overall impression of what Sixx:A.M. music is. There’s going to a lot of songs from every single record.

MS: Can I ask what were the most requested songs?

JM: That’s a great question! Interestingly enough, I would say that one of the most requested songs is a song called “Skin,” which is just a piano ballad that was on This Is Gonna Hurt, but that song has touched a lot of people. It’s resonated with our fans in a way that surprised all of us. And also very interesting, some of the more obscure songs were the most requested, which excites us because those are also the ones that challenge us and are really what makes Sixx:A.M. what it is. Not just the radio songs, but the ones that get a little deeper into the records. When that happens it validated the blood, the sweat and the tears that you put into your records. When you’re doing it, every single moment of these records is so important to you when you’re creating them, but you never know how it’s going to touch somebody and you never know whether it’s just going to be a fleeting passing moment in their lives or if it’s going to really become the backdrop or the soundtrack to somebody’s life, and when it does become that, it’s just so rewarding. That is something that excites us about being able to go out face to face with these people that have come to us and said, “Wow, this song or that song has really affected my life.” And to just be able to make that personal connection finally and have music be the conduit, it’s just really thrilling to all of us.

One last question before I let you go. Why won’t Sixx:A.M. claim a permanent drummer already?

JM: That’s a good question. So far it’s been working for us the way we’ve been doing it. We’ve brought Dustin Steinke from Bleeker Ridge and we’ve been loving him as a drummer, so we’ll see. We’ll see what the future holds as far as a drummer goes.

 

Catch Sixx:A.M. and Apocalyptica with Bleeker Ridge at the sold-out Starland Ballroom in Sayreville, NJ on April 24, then with VAMPS at Best Buy Theater in NYC on April 27 and at the Electric Factory in Philadelphia, PA on April 28. For more on Sixx:A.M., visit sixxammusic.com, and for more on Apocalyptica, go to apocalyptica.com.

Apocalyptica — Opening for Sixx A.M. this month of April!

Check out Apocalyptica’s new CD, “Shadowmaker,” due out in 3 weeks!!! Apocalyptica is one of the bands opening for Sixx A.M. this month!

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'http://po.st/BuyShadowmaker'
'http://po.st/BuyShadowmaker'

Flick through your own limited edition ‪#‎shadowmaker‬ Mediabook – available to pre-order now!

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– Apocalyptica HQ